Program overview

09:15 – 09:30

Welcome


09:30 – 10:30

Keynote - Andreas Holtermann, University of Southern Denmark: Public and Occupational physical activity research – why different, when is the same

How much time people spend on different behaviors over the day is of great importance for their wellbeing and health. The research on physical activity and health started by the studies of Morris and Paffenbarger on the physical activity at work. Afterwards, the focus shifted to investigating physical activity during commuting, sports and leisure time. Since these very first studies, the research has either been limited to a) investigating the health effects of physical activity in a single domain (often claiming “independence” from the other domains), or b) not incorporating the very different context, constraints and characteristics of the physical activity in the different domains. This has led the research in public and occupational physical activity and health to operate in different “silos”, with different taxonomy, scientific journals, conferences, findings and guidelines.

10:30 – 11:00

Morning Coffee Break


11:00 – 12:30

Workshops (Part 1):

Assessing physical activity using motion sensors for beginners– data collection, data handling and basic data reporting

Örjan Ekblom, The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences

As we come to understand more about how different parts of our physical activity pattern relate to bodily functions and health, sound methods for their assessment is being developed. The inclusion of technically based methods has increased our understanding in this field. The 24-h composition of physical activities and the low-intense type of activity has both been shown to be of importance, but is very hard to capture with precision using observation of self-reports. Previously often termed “objective”, the accelerometer technique has several benefits, but as it includes several decisions regarding data collection and analysis, it is not a one-size-fits-all technique and hence not at all “objective”. This has sadly slowed down the application in research, surveys and clinical practice.

The beginners track at the ISMPB workshop aims at presenting the accelerometer technique to researchers, clinicians and public health professionals. The intention is to promote and encourage the application of its use.

The workshop will include

  • Data collection (study period, placement, monitor type, distribution)
  • Data analysis (data cleaning, interpretation of raw data, transformation and analysis)
  • Use of accelerometer data in counselling and clinical work.
  • Basic handling of accelerometer data in statistical analysis.
  • The accelerometer method in different types of study designs, clinical applications or in public health work.

Compositional data analysis (CoDA) in physical activity and occupational health epidemiology

Nidhi Gupta, The National Research Centre for the Working Environment

Charlotte Lund Rasmussen, National Research Centre for the Working Environment

A day is finite, summing to 24 hours. Therefore, increasing time in one physical behavior (sedentary behaviors, physical activities or sleep) will inevitably decrease time in at least one other behavior in a day. This constrained nature of such data needs a special analytical approach—compositional data analysis (CoDA).

CoDA has been emerging within the field of physical activity and occupational health epidemiology. Therefore, this workshop aims to provide a theoretical and practical knowledge on the ‘whys’ and the ‘hows’ of CoDA, using relevant examples from physical activity and occupational health research.


12:30 – 13:30

Lunch Break


13:30 – 15:00

Workshops (Part 2):

Assessing physical activity using motion sensors for beginners– data collection, data handling and basic data reporting - CONT'D

Örjan Ekblom, The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences

As we come to understand more about how different parts of our physical activity pattern relate to bodily functions and health, sound methods for their assessment is being developed. The inclusion of technically based methods has increased our understanding in this field. The 24-h composition of physical activities and the low-intense type of activity has both been shown to be of importance, but is very hard to capture with precision using observation of self-reports. Previously often termed “objective”, the accelerometer technique has several benefits, but as it includes several decisions regarding data collection and analysis, it is not a one-size-fits-all technique and hence not at all “objective”. This has sadly slowed down the application in research, surveys and clinical practice.

The beginners track at the ISMPB workshop aims at presenting the accelerometer technique to researchers, clinicians and public health professionals. The intention is to promote and encourage the application of its use.

The workshop will include

  • Data collection (study period, placement, monitor type, distribution)
  • Data analysis (data cleaning, interpretation of raw data, transformation and analysis)
  • Use of accelerometer data in counselling and clinical work.
  • Basic handling of accelerometer data in statistical analysis.
  • The accelerometer method in different types of study designs, clinical applications or in public health work.

Compositional data analysis (CoDA) in physical activity and occupational health epidemiology - CONT'D

Nidhi Gupta, The National Research Centre for the Working Environment

Charlotte Lund Rasmussen, National Research Centre for the Working Environment

A day is finite, summing to 24 hours. Therefore, increasing time in one physical behavior (sedentary behaviors, physical activities or sleep) will inevitably decrease time in at least one other behavior in a day. This constrained nature of such data needs a special analytical approach—compositional data analysis (CoDA).

CoDA has been emerging within the field of physical activity and occupational health epidemiology. Therefore, this workshop aims to provide a theoretical and practical knowledge on the ‘whys’ and the ‘hows’ of CoDA, using relevant examples from physical activity and occupational health research.


15:00 – 15:30

Afternoon Coffee Break


15:30 – 17:30

Oral Sessions

More information coming soon…

17:45 – 18:30

Social run, Town walk


19:00 – 22:00

Reception with buffet

09:00 – 10:00

Keynote - Paul Jarle Mork, Norwegian University of Science and Technology: A general population perspective on physical behaviour and sleep: The Norwegian HUNT study

Accelerometer-based measurements of physical behaviour and sleep are now commonly implemented in large population-based studies and longitudinal studies to supplement or replace self-reports. In the fourth round of the Norwegian HUNT Study, we used a dual-accelerometer set-up to measure physical behaviours and sleep in 6,800 adolescents and 32,000 adults. By using machine learning techniques, we have developed data models that provide accurate detection of common everyday physical behaviours and sleep duration. The data from the HUNT Study allow us to characterise how the circadian physical behaviour and sleep characteristics vary throughout the lifespan and how it relates to wellbeing and health outcomes.

10:00 – 10:30

Morning Coffee Break


10:30 – 12:15

Workshop:

Physical behavior profiles determined on basis of repeated measurements within individuals

David Hallman, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Department of Occupational Health Sciences and Psychology, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle

Research on objective measurements of physical behavior often results in huge data sets of multiple variables, and measures are often obtained at repeated occasions. Analysis and interpretation of 24-hour physical behavior data in relation to health and intervention strategies are obvious challenges. In this case, identifying sub-groups of individuals with distinct activity profiles is useful for examining complex activity patterns, including change in activity patterns over time. In this workshop, we will discuss how latent class analysis can be used to capture profiles of physical behaviors in different study designs.


12:15 – 13:15

Lunch Break


13:15 – 14:45

Poster Session

More information coming soon…

 


15:00 – 16:00

Closing Remarks

What’s new, what’s next? What have we learned and where are we going?

Svend Erik Mathiassen, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Department of Occupational Health Sciences and Psychology, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle